The Double Alibi by Noël Vindry

DoubleAlibiOver the past year I have been slowly but surely working my way through the Locked Room International back catalogue in a rather haphazard way, picking titles based on positive reviews comments from blogging chums and on occasion because an element of the premise intrigued me. Though I own The Howling Beast and The House That Kills I decided I would skip over those titles after I read JJ’s review of this title.

There were a few aspects of the novel that appealed to me in advance but what caught my attention the most was the problem of a person appearing to have been in multiple places at once. As TomCat quite rightly points out, this is not really an impossible situation as there are perfectly clear explanations given for each of the sightings but the reader and M. Allou have to work out how these different threads are woven together.

The subject of those reported sightings is Gustave Allevaire, a thief who has been in prison several times to his cousins’ mortification. They are constantly trying to persuade their aunt who they care for and who expects to receive a sizeable inheritance whenever her brother passes away that he is a bad lot but she still sees him as a cheeky youngster rather than a career criminal.

They hear from a family friend that Gustave has been seen in the vicinity of their home so when they wake at one in the morning to discover that the silver and their life savings have been pilfered they instantly suspect him. Things are looking even bleaker for Gustave when his fingerprints are discovered on a few pieces of silver that were dropped in the house. The problem is that at precisely the same time he was supposedly stealing from their home he was also breaking into but not stealing money from his employer’s desk nine hours drive away and in a third location (I’m not spoiling that one for you – it is a great reveal).

Enter M. Allou, a juge d’instruction who takes charge of investigating these cases in spite of their occurring in separate jurisdictions. In the course of the novella he travels to each of the crime scenes, interviewing the witnesses and trying to make sense of how Gustave appears to have been in three places at once.

The novel is at its best in the opening and closing sections as it lays out the facts of the incidents and explains the links between them. I found the scenes with the Levalois sisters and their aunt to be entertaining and their relationship to be well observed. The characterization is strong and I appreciated the time Vindry spends explaining their living situation as it does help bring them to life rather than existing just to serve the puzzle.

Similarly I really responded well to the characters in the office where Gustave had been working and, in particular, to the uncertain interpersonal relationship between the witness who claims to have seen Gustave and the owner’s sister. Even the police officers that Allou works alongside prove interesting and colorful!

Unfortunately while I appreciated the strong character work, I did find that the novel seemed to drag a little for me in the middle. In this section we witness Allou and his colleagues mulling over the different theories about who may be at best incorrect or possibly lying about what they saw, a process that becomes a little repetitive as we wait for a breakthrough to happen.

Happily that does come along with a small locked room problem to liven things up as we get ready for Allou to have his breakthrough and work out what was done and how. Those explanations are quite clever and do make sense of the tangle of links between the three appearances. I certainly didn’t get close to solving this one and kicked myself about not picking up on a couple of points once the explanations were given which is really what I’m hoping to get out of reading an impossible crime story.

Overall, I am glad I finally got around to reading one of the Vindry books I have had sat on my to read pile for months and I certainly appreciated some of the interesting character choices the author made. The puzzle, while not impossible, is clever and stimulating and I did enjoy the way everything is brought together at the end. I will be curious to try the other Vindry novels in the future though I think my next Locked Room International stop will be a return to Halter.

14 thoughts on “The Double Alibi by Noël Vindry

  1. My introduction to Vindri was this book too.

    I was similarly not impressed, and I agree that the middle drags far too much for its own good.

    Luckily shortly after I read the The Howling Beast which is as good as they come.

    I presume you’re already familiar with Jonathan Creek but anyway. S02E02 has a similar premise with a man being seen in two places simultaneously

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    1. I am happy to hear that The Howling Beast worked for you since that’s probably my next Vindry. I am a Creek fan and that episode is one of my favorites.

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      1. You can add my recommendation for The Howling Beast to the list. Unquestionably, the best of the three Vindry’s published by LRI and one of the strongest title in their catalog.

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      1. That used to be the case – but I believe there are now Kindle versions for all three Noel Vindry republications by LRI. My copy of ‘Double Alibi’ is an ebook.

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  2. Thanks for the review. 😊 My first foray into Noel Vindry was ‘Howling Beast’ – looks like neither of the other two novels, ‘House that Kills’ and ‘Double Alibi’, reach the same standard or quality. Ah well, at least they have been reprinted for our enjoyment! 🤓

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    1. It does seem that The Howling Beast is reckoned to be on another, higher level from what everyone says. I did enjoy the scenario quite a lot, even if I wish the middle was trimmed a little.

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