The Vengeful Virgin by Gil Brewer

VengefulThe Vengeful Virgin is a pulp novel from the 1950s that on the face of it seems a little out of my reading comfort zone. The reason it jumped out at me though is that it is another example of my favorite subgenre, the inverted crime story and I came to it feeling somewhat optimistic based on my experiences with the other hard-boiled inverted stories I have reviewed recently.

The novel concerns a pair of lovers with an almost primal physical attraction to one another and their plot to kill the girl’s rich stepfather who is an invalid. The girl, eighteen year-old Shirley Angela, has been caring for him for three years and resents his demands. She knows that she is in line to receive a big inheritance from him but knows that with medical intervention he could live for ten years or longer.

When protagonist Jack Ruxton, a television installation engineer, first crosses paths with her she has already devised a crude plan to get rid of him. The two are instantly drawn to each other and she brings him in on the plan. He quickly expresses concern that her idea to have a television topple onto him would immediately be traced back to them and suggests his own plan…

Jack is far from a charming guy and is in some ways a little reminiscent of the male murderer in Roger Bax’s Disposing of Henry, another inverted story. This similarity extends right to the character’s casual description of Shirley as  someone who “…made you feel as if you wanted to rape her” and is attracted to her in part because of her youth. Their relationship is all kinds of problematic if the author’s intention is to titillate his reader as Jason John Horn notes in an essay he wrote about chauvinism and ableism in this novel. Be aware that essay does spoil some key plot developments!

I am on the fence about whether Brewer intends to appeal to that side of his readers here or not. If that was the aim I think he misses the mark in any case as those scenes, while frequent, do little to appeal to the reader’s senses. They do effectively establish the main character as a seedy, brutish man who uses the women in his life to fulfil his own desires whether physical or financial.

Shirley is cast as a mix of vixen and femme fatale. She certainly tempts Jack into committing a crime though he did not need much persuasion and she repeatedly expresses her desire for him. The characterization is not particularly complex and perhaps the one revelation that may have added a little punch is spoiled within the book, reducing the impact of a key moment within the novel’s conclusion.

Though Brewer’s characters feel a little flat, the plotting is a little more interesting. I was impressed with the idea that Jack comes up with for its relative simplicity and the scene in which the plan is carried out contains some wonderful moments of tension. Throughout the build up to that moment we are made aware of the danger they face and anticipate some of the things that might go wrong. These problems are foreshadowed very effectively and while I think it would be a stretch to say there are mystery elements here, the reader can try to work out how those elements will combine to cause their downfall.

While the reader will likely predict elements of the novel’s conclusion, I do think it contains some of the novel’s strongest imagery and dramatic moments. That sequence sums up the novel’s themes well and it feels like a logical and powerful resolution to the story.

Unfortunately the journey to that point underwhelms, particularly in the saggy middle of the tale where we wait for the pair to actually get on with committing their crime. Neither Jack nor Shirley are interesting or likeable enough to make their relationship compelling and there are no unexpected revelations or moments featuring them that may have made them more complex or interesting and might have helped to drive the story.

Though The Vengeful Virgin has some strong moments, not least its punchy ending, I think it never rises above its often flat, unpleasant characterizations and the slow pacing of the scenes in which the pair develop their plan. It is not badly written and it does have a few good ideas but the sometimes seedy tone (which, to be fair, is totally hinted at in its title) had little appeal for me.

4 thoughts on “The Vengeful Virgin by Gil Brewer

  1. I didn’t particularly like this book.
    The plot idea is good and has been used successfully by James M. Cain. The writing style is also quite good.
    What irked me were the unbelievably silly mistakes made by the murderers. It is because of these silly mistakes that they get caught and not due to any clever detective work.
    SPOILER ALERT !
    SPOILER ALERT !

    When Jack plans the murder, wouldn’t he care to find out when Shirley would get the money after her stepfather’s death? Yet he doesn’t know this and is deceived in the matter by Dr. Miraglia.
    Jack writes down the murder plan on a paper to ensure that there is no flaw and then leaves it to be found by others. This is unbelievably stupid. When a murderer writes down the plan on a paper, wouldn’t he be anxious to destroy it quickly or keep it well-hidden?
    Jack takes the original condenser out of the intercom claiming it to be defective and then stupidly leaves it behind on the windowsill to be found and checked by others. Would a murderer really make such a mistake?
    There are other examples.

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    1. I can understand your frustrations with the murderer and I do agree he makes some big goofs. I do think he quickly loses control of his plan due to some external forces and events and so might never expect his home to be searched. The drinking probably doesn’t help much either.

      But yeah, it is frustrating to see the pair make mistake after mistake.

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  2. A surprise to see this on your list! Too bad it was a disappointment. I recently read Megan Abbott’s recent pastiche of 50s noir, Queenpin. It is outrageously fun.

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