My Fellow Citizens! (TV)

Show Details

국민 여러분! (Korean)
Originally Broadcast: 2019
36 episodes
Starring: Choi Siwon, Lee Yoo-Young, Kim Min-Young
Available on Viki (US)

The Blurb

A con man, who gets involved with unexpected incidents, marries a police officer and somehow ends up running to become a member of the National Assembly. (Wikipedia)

The Verdict

A lively and amusing comedic drama that sustains its farcical premise surprisingly well.


My Fellow Citizens! (국민 여러분!) is a comedic drama about a con man who discovers on the day of his marriage that his wife is a police officer. If this wasn’t problem enough, a loan shark he scammed catches up with him in search of their money.

Presented as short half hour episodes, this series is at its most successful when Yang Jung-kook (played by the incredibly charming Choi Siwon) is running a con or working to out-maneuver someone. There are several excellent set pieces and a few of the twists in the story are genuinely surprising and quite cleverly constructed.

Siwon’s performance as Jung-kook is very good as he manages to create a character who is simultaneously very charming and yet also often quite frustrating. We know how this character feels about his wife and yet we see that he is unable to find a better path for himself that will remove the barriers to trust in that relationship. We also get a sense of the harm some of his cons can cause which is a bit of a rarity in the con genre which tends to emphasize the style and trickery over its consequences. Still, we also get to see him evolve over the course of the series and while he may not be a good man (at least at the start), we quickly see there are far worse people out there.

Lee Yoo-young is strong and sympathetic as his wife, Kim Mi-young, and she gets to make a truly memorable entrance. I appreciated that she is shown to be passionate and skilled at her work and I particularly enjoyed the way the early episodes play with the idea that she is unwittingly trying to hunt down her own husband. This leads to some brilliant comedic scenes and I was surprised at how well the series sustains this tension.

The show also includes a heavy dose of social commentary, both about the resurgence of populist politics worldwide and about corruption, the influence of money in politics and the decline of civic values. While some of these themes are presented in ways that are quite specific to South Korea and its National Assembly, many are universal and for most of its run the show balances these serious elements well with more lighthearted, comedic moments.

One of the ways it does this is through the character of Kim Joo-Myung, a Member of the National Assembly who has been forced out on corruption charges and who is being blackmailed into helping Yang Jung-kook. This part is played perfectly by Kim Eui-sung who injects a wonderful cynicism and weariness into the character and gets many of the biggest laughs as he tries to keep an unruly political campaign on track only to be frustrated by his independent-minded candidate.

The only disappointment for me was in its ending which shifts the emphasis away from the characters’ relationship problem onto its social and political themes. As a result I felt that some parts of the story were not given quite the degree of attention and resolution that I was looking for. Specifically the resolution of the conflict between Jung-kook and Mi-young feels a little too rushed, which is a shame given the strong build up. Still, overall I found the depiction of their relationship to be enjoyable and really appreciated the way the two actors played off each other.

Finally I have to mention the show’s fantastic musical score. For those unfamiliar with k-dramas, there are typically recurring musical themes and stings that are used pretty frequently at key points in each episode and that is not any different here. This show’s score, which ranges from rap to pop, is brash, lively and often deployed to heighten the humor in the show’s most comedic scenes. In particular, I loved this song which is STILL stuck in my head months after first watching it.

Overall, I enjoyed this series to be consistently entertaining and amusing. If its final few episodes fall a little short of the comedic heights reached in it earliest episodes, the show is still amusing and hits some strong dramatic moments. Fans of heist stories should find enough to enjoy here, particularly if they are open to the series’ romance themes and elements.

Why I Love… How To Steal A Million

After receiving such a positive reaction to my previous Why I Love video post in which I discussed Carol Reed’s The Third Man, I have decided to make this a monthly series. The plan is that I will discuss a crime or mystery-themed film each month and list five reasons that I love that film.

My selection this month is 1966’s How to Steal a Million. If you are unfamiliar with this film directed by William Wyler and starring Audrey Hepburn and Peter O’Toole, it is based around a heist at an art museum though it arguably is more romantic comedy than serious crime film.

Have you seen the film? If so, I’d love to hear your thoughts whether you agree with me or not. Feel free to drop suggestions for other comedic heist or mystery films as well!

Why I Love… The Third Man

A few weeks ago I was asked to pick my favorite film as part of a getting to know you exercise. While some people agonized over their choices, I found it to be a really easy question to answer because that film has been my favorite since I first discovered it in my teen years. In fact, it was a sufficient draw for me that I bought my first Blu-Ray player specifically to watch it when Criterion reissued it a number of years ago.

Of course once I gave it as my answer I felt drawn to rewatch it again and, in doing so, I was left with a strong desire to post about it here. As it happens I already planned to discuss the novella Greene wrote (while he was commissioned to write a screenplay, he found it easier to write a story that he could then adapt – a practice Disney would use a few years later on Lady and the Tramp). This struck me as an ideal opportunity to play around with the video camera a little bit more and explain my thoughts about the film.

So, here they are – my thoughts on what I consider to be my favorite film and one that I think mystery fans ought to watch. I did keep my comments spoiler-free and if you haven’t seen it yet I would strongly suggest avoiding reading anything else about it before you do – even the blurbs tend to spoil the film’s biggest moment…

Whether you agree with me or not, I would love to hear your own thoughts about the film and, if not, of course I’d be interested in your own picks!

Death in Paradise: Series Four

DiP4
Previous series reviews:
Series One
Series Two
Series Three

It’s time to return to the fictional Caribbean island of Saint-Marie for another series of Death in Paradise mysteries. I was late in discovering the show and have been binge-watching it, writing these posts as I go.

In my previous post about the show I covered the third series which brought about the first changes to the show’s regular cast. This fourth series features some further changes with two departures and two additions.

Sergeant Best is the first to depart but, to my frustration, this has happened off screen in the gap between series three and four. Having invested in and liked the character it is a shame that he didn’t get a proper farewell.

I was a little better prepared for the second departure of the series as Camille is written out. While it is still pretty abrupt given that earlier episodes in the season were still playing with the possibility of a romance with Goodman, this is at least handled throughout the course of the story and the moment of departure feels satisfying, providing some closure.

Happily I liked both of the additions a lot, feeling that they both brought something new to the show. Joséphine Jobert is charming as DS Florence Cassell, establishing quite a different relationship with DI Goodman than her predecessor that focuses more on her professional skills than their interpersonal relationship. That being said, there are some nice moments between the pair that suggest strong mutual respect developing by the end of this series.

Officer J. P. Hooper is youthful and enthusiastic while adding a serious streak that makes him a solid foil for Dwayne. He gets quite a lot to do here and does grow a little over the series.

In terms of the cases I think that this raised the standard from the previous series. Several cases presenting interesting problems to solve, Swimming in Murder defeating me completely. Even the weaker cases possess interesting subplots and guest performances making for a consistently entertaining run of episodes.

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Death in Paradise: Series Three

The third series of Death in Paradise is the first to ring significant changes to the cast. Ben Miller departs early in the series to be replaced by Kris Marshall who at this point was best known for his role in the long-running sitcom My Family.

Time for what may possibly be a controversial opinion: I prefer DI Goodman to DI Poole. This is not saying anything negative about Ben Miller who is entertaining but rather that I think Goodman brings something new and interesting to the show.

Where Poole tried to retain his sense of structure and British identity, Goodman is trying to reinvent himself. The comedy comes from his misjudged attempts to integrate to life on Saint-Marie which I think offers more room for the character to grow.

I think it helps as well that this season sets a high standard in terms of the stories it is telling. There are several stories that have striking premises such as Ye of Little Faith, The Early Bird and Rue Morgue and I appreciated that the secondary characters seem to get a little more to do this season.

Next time around I’ll be looking at the show’s fourth season which will bring further changes to the cast.

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Death in Paradise: Series Two

DiP2This continues my series of posts I started recently about the mystery series Death in Paradise. This time we are moving onto the show’s second series which retained the core cast from the first though it is clear that there was a slight tweaking of the tone with several of the stories here containing darker elements.

While there were not many contenders for my eventual Top 5 Death in Paradise episodes among the stories from this series, I felt that the average standard was higher than in the series before. Only A Deadly Curse struck me as dull.

Other stories in the season are far stronger, particularly A Dash of Sunshine which combines excellent sleuthing with the entertaining dynamics.

Next time I’ll take a look at the third series which sees the first of many changes to the Honoré Police Station roster.

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Colonel March of Scotland Yard

MarchOnce again my busy schedule has struck and I have had to reach for a piece I had penned about a mystery television series. For those whose interests lie solely in the printed page rest assured that book reviews are coming!

Colonel March of Scotland Yard was a television series from the mid-50s based on John Dickson Carr’s short stories set in the Department of Queer Events within Scotland Yard. The premise is not dissimilar from Roy Vickers’ Department of Dead Ends in that it exists to investigate offbeat, odd and otherwise inexplicable cases.

I should say up front that I haven’t read the short stories. Part of the reason that this post has been on the shelf was that I had hoped to track down an affordable copy but having spent months trying I am having to give up. As keen as I am to read it, I can’t justify spending close to $200 on a copy right now, particularly as people whose opinions I trust say it’s not Carr’s best work. Someday I will hope to rectify that.

The star of the show was Boris Karloff who was, of course, most famous for his roles in monster movies several decades earlier. This is a significantly different type of role and he plays his part with a sort of wry, good humor, often needling his colleague Inspector Ames (Ewan Roberts) who appears in most of the episodes and Inspector Goron of the French Surete (Eric Pohlmann) who is a semi-regular guest.

The stories themselves are quite uneven in quality and they do suffer from the limitations of the filming styles and constraints of the period as well as the short running time. As a result of the latter plots can sometimes feel a little flimsy or key elements stand out a little too much but even the episodes that don’t work brilliantly as mysteries will usually be quite entertaining in terms of the performances or broader concepts.

Some stories do stand out as being strong however such as the first episode, The Sorcerer, which features a simple idea but a clever and effective one. Fans of Carr’s gothic elements will likely enjoy The Talking Head which I think stands up best of the series as a whole and has a very clever explanation. Death and the Other Monkey and The Stolen Crime are also each excellent, particularly the latter which I consider one of the strongest episodes of the show.

I will say that this series does require a little patience with and tolerance for 1950s television. The viewer will often notice the limitations of the studio space (Passage at Arms struck me as somewhat ludicrous), slightly misplayed lines and, of course, somewhat static RP performances. Fortunately the latter is nowhere near as bad as you might expect given the era and fans of British films and television from the era may enjoy some of the before-they-were-famous guest appearances. Of these the Christopher Lee appearance in At Night All Cats Are Gray stands out for his attempts at an extremely questionable French accent.

Though it can be a little rough around the edges, Colonel March of Scotland Yard is frequently imaginative and fun. Episodes zip by and while I sometimes wanted an extra plot element to sink my teeth into, the content is usually good. If you have never sought it out before I would suggest that it is certainly worth a look.

The broadcast order of these episodes differs by territory so I am going by the sequence they are in on Amazon Instant Video. Summaries and comments on every single episode follow after the cut.

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